103: Interactive Kiosk (Diagnostic Imaging)

The below content replicates the content of the physical exhibit at CSU Spur. It can be used for reference, language translation, and additional accessibility.

Diagnostic Imaging: Through the Eyes of a Vet

Use these X-rays and ultrasounds to look inside a cat, dog, or horse. Diagnostic images help veterinary teams diagnose problems and treat animals in their care.

Image Caption: Veterinary team members conducting contrast radiography (venogram).

Dog Case Study #1 with x-rays and photos — external fixator

One Brave Pup

he CSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital saw this patient when he fractured the tibia and fibula bones of his left hind leg. The veterinary team repaired his injury using a device called an external fixator. 

Image Caption: This dog has an external fixator to help heal its fracture. Photo courtesy of CSU.

Bone Fractures

Veterinarians used two X-ray (radiograph) views (cranial, lateral) to assess placement of the device and the fracture immediately after repair. Can you see the fracture in each radiograph?

Image Caption: Post-surgery radiographs of external fixature repair of the tibia and fibula fracture. Photo courtesy of CSU.

External Fixature

Veterinarians use an external fixature to stabilize the fractured bones and allow them to heal while also giving the animal the ability to walk during the healing process. 

Image Caption: External frame of the fixature post-operation. Photo courtesy of CSU.

Compare the Radiographs

In addition to taking radiographs to help diagnose bone fractures, veterinary teams use radiographs during the healing process to make sure the bone is healing properly.

Dog Case Study #2 with X-rays and Photos – Dog Pregnancy

Pregnancy Radiographs (X-Rays)

Radiographs can be used at later stages of pregnancy to see how far along a pregnancy is, as well as determine the number and location of the puppies. What do you see in this close-up image?

Image Caption: Close-up of pregnancy radiograph.

Count the Puppies

How many puppies can you find? What other bones and features do you notice?

Image Caption: Labeled pups in pregnancy radiograph.

Dog Pelvis

During birth, puppies have to pass through the birth canal, which is formed by the pelvis and sacrum, or the large, triangle-shaped bone at the end of the spine.

Image Caption: Rotating 3D anatomy of a dog pelvis.

Dog Case Study #3 with X-rays and Photos – Dog Skull

Canine Skull

The shape of the skull may determine how easy it is for a puppy to pass through the birth canal. Some dog breeds regularly need a veterinarian’s assistance for safe delivery of the litter.

Image Caption: Rotating 3D anatomy of a canine (dog) skull.

Horse Case Study #1 with X-rays and Photos – Horse Skull

Equine (Horse) Skull

A horse’s skull has large bony ridges and indentions for the attachment of muscles. Large air-filled sinuses in the skull also help to create these large attachment areas without making the head too heavy.

Image Caption: Rotating 3D anatomy of an equine (horse) skull.

Cat Case Study #1 with X-rays and Photos – Cat Skull

Feline (Cat) Skull

The shape of a kitten’s skull rarely blocks its passage through the birth canal. What is different about a cat skull that makes its birth less complicated than a dog’s or a horse’s birth?

Image Caption: Rotating 3D anatomy of a feline (cat) skull.

Cat Case Study #2 with X-rays and Photos – Cat Pregnancy

Pregnancy Radiographs (X-Rays)

Radiographs can be used at later stages of pregnancy to see how far along a pregnancy is, as well as determine the number and location of the kittens. What can you see in this close-up image?

Image Caption: Close-up image of feline (cat) pregnancy radiograph. 

Kitten Birth

Try to find the two kittens visible in the abdomen region. During birth they will need to pass through the birth canal that is formed by the pelvis and sacrum, or the large, triangle-shaped bone at the end of the spine.

Image Caption: Radiograph of pregnant feline (cat) with color overlay. 

Cat Pelvis

The pelvis and sacrum (the triangle-shaped bone at the end of the spine) form the passageway that the kittens will have to pass through during birth.

Image Caption: Rotating 3D anatomy of a feline (cat) pelvis.

BIDTAH BECKER

Associate Attorney, Navajo Tribal Utility Authority

Ms. Becker has dedicated her career to the Navajo Nation and its natural resources.  She is currently serving as an Associate Attorney for the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority.  Prior to this position, she had the honor of serving as the Director of the Navajo Nation Division of Natural Resources from May 2013 to January 2019, as an appointee of President Begaye and Vice-President Nez, after serving eleven (11) years as an attorney for the Navajo Nation focusing on water rights and natural resources issues.  Continuing her deep interest and passion for water, she serves on the Leadership Team for the Water and Tribes Initiative in the Colorado River Basin, as a Commissioner on the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission, as an appointee of Governor Lujan Grisham, and on the Navajo Nation Water Rights Commission, as an appointee of Speaker Damon.  Ms. Becker is equally passionate about supporting artists and serves as a Trustee for the Institute of American Indian Arts and Culture (IAIA), as an appointee of President Obama.  Ms. Becker is a member of the Nation and lives on the Navajo Nation in Fort Defiance with her husband and two school age children.

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